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Sunday, November 20, 2005

"Close to Home" Continues Strong for CBS

Move to Friday is a Winner for 2nd Week for the Jim Leonard, Jr. Drama

The good ratings news continued for the second straight week for "Close to Home," the CBS drama created by New Haven native Jim Leonard, Jr. CBS moved the season's new television series to Fridays for sweeps month.

"Close to Home" won its 9 PM time period and that helped the CBS Network post a strong win for the whole night.

A so-so performer on Tuesdays becomes a winner on Friday night.

The "Close to Home" storyline is set in Indianapolis.

Comments:
I don't know how CLOSLEY Jim checks his show before it goes out. A perfect example in the last show was when a witness idenified herself from VALPARISO (emphasis on the i instead of the A)Oh well, only a couple of million people knew it was wrong. It's only a suberb of Chicago.
 
Your fondness for this piece of krep series is baffling. I don't think the entire city of Cincinnati cared this much for the fictional WKRP.
 
Good comment on the mispronunciation of an Indiana place name on the show. Let's hope Jim won't be having them tackle a crime set in Dubois County or the town of Versailles, Indiana.

The same mispronuciation problems cropped up on network news coverage during the recent coverage of the Indiana tornado damage.

As for the second comment. I don't have a particular fondness for the series; I don't watch much television. I do have an interest in the fellow who created it - Jim Leonard, Jr.

Jim spent his adolescent years in New Haven, Indiana and is a graduate of New Haven Senior High School, Class of 1974. Jim has always self-identified his hometown as New Haven throughout his professional career.

As for the show being a piece of "krep." Well, the beauty of a weblog is that everybody is free to offer up their own review of television shows, newscasters, and politicians.

However, I was a little unsure as to the meaning of the word as the commenter wrote it. I suspect the writer meant it as a variation of a word for "excrement" but it could have been the German spelling for "crepe", the small, thin pancake.
 
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